his information is excerpted from The Nutriflex Eating Better Program Guide - Compiled by Teresa Ann Dorian, Ph.D. The guide is out of print.

 

Triticale

HISTORY:

After decades of research which began over a Hundred years ago, triticale (pronounced tri-ti-CAY-lee) was developed in the 1960s by crossbreeding two types of wheat with rye, resulting in a hybrid that is nutritionally superior to either rye or wheat. The purpose for developing the grain was to obtain the generous yield of wheat and the cold-hardiness of rye. Triticale proved susceptible to the fungus disease ergot and the agricultural difficulties have made it clear that triticale is not the "superfood of the future" as many hoped it would be. Ancient grains which have been re-introduced such as spelt, amaranth and quinoa are the real "super grains".

CHARACTERISTICS:

At 16% protein, triticale is similar to wheat but it contains a larger percentage of the amino acids than either rye or wheat, It also has a good supply of lysine, the amino acid usually deficient in grains. Triticale has the nutty taste of wheat and the pleasantly sour taste of rye. The berries have a long slender shape and are used in the same way as rye or wheat berries.

HOW TO PREPARE:

Basic Cooked Triticale Berries: Use 3½ parts water to I part grain. Bring the water to a boil, stir in the grain, return to a boil, then lower the heat and simmer, covered about 50 to 55 minutes, If the grain is still too chewy for you, add another ½ cup water for every cup of raw grain that was used and simmer until it is absorbed. The berries may be presoaked in water overnight to reduce the cooking time somewhat.

AMARANTH 

KAMUT

SPELT

OATS

MILLET

BARLEY

BROWN RICE

CORN

QUINOA

RYE

BLUE CORN

TRITICALE

WHEAT

WILD RICE

SORGHUM